A Rooftop Coating Uses Sunlight To Actively Cool Your House

Via Fast Company, a report on a rooftop coating that uses sunlight to actively cool your house: As the planet gets hotter, the use of air conditioning keeps growing—and adding to emissions that make future heat waves even more likely. But a new type of coating could help buildings cool down without relying as heavily […]

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Mayor Adams Wants To Grow Cannabis On NYCHA Rooftops

Via The Gothamist, a report that New York City mayor Eric Adams wants to use rooftop space on public housing to grow cannabis: Mayor Eric Adams’ vision of erecting cannabis greenhouses on top of New York City’s public housing buildings has run into a significant obstacle: The federal government. At an April 9 panel discussion […]

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Rooftop Gardens Can Help Alleviate Heat in Cities

Via EcoWatch, a report on how rooftop gardens can help alleviate heat in cities: If you’ve even spent a summer in the city and been able to relate to the song of the same name then you know the feeling of wanting to escape the heat by sitting in a patch of cool grass under the shade […]

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Cainiao Taps Rooftop Solar Panels to Power Bonded Warehouses

Via Alizila, a report on one Chinese company’s efforts to utilize rooftop solar panels to power its bonded warehouses: Alibaba Group’s logistics arm Cainiao Network has started to use energy generated by rooftop solar panels installed on its bonded warehouses in China to power the operations within. The two warehouses, located in Hangzhou and Ningbo in eastern […]

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Big-box Stores Could Slash Emissions By Putting Solar Panels On Roofs

Via CNN, a look at how big-box stores could help slash emissions and save millions by putting solar panels on roofs, but many do not yet do it: As the US attempts to wean itself off its heavy reliance on fossil fuels and shift to cleaner energy sources, many experts are eyeing a promising solution: your neighborhood big-box […]

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A Fight Over Rooftop Solar Threatens California’s Climate Goals

Courtesy of The New York Times, commentary on a fight over rooftop solar that threatens California’s climate goals: California has led the nation in setting ambitious climate change goals and policies. But the state’s progress is threatened by a nasty fight between rival camps in the energy industry that both consider themselves proponents of renewable energy. The […]

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About This Blog And Its Author
As potential uses for building and parking lot roofspace continue to grow, unique opportunities to understand and profit from this trend will emerge. Roof Options is committed to tracking the evolving uses of roof estate – spanning solar power, rainwater harvesting, wind power, gardens & farms, “cooling” sites, advertising, apiculture, and telecom transmission platforms – to help unlock the nascent, complex, and expanding roofspace asset class.

Educated at Yale University (Bachelor of Arts - History) and Harvard (Master in Public Policy - International Development), Monty Simus has held a lifelong interest in environmental and conservation issues, primarily as they relate to freshwater scarcity, renewable energy, and national park policy. Working from a water-scarce base in Las Vegas with his wife and son, he is the founder of Water Politics, an organization dedicated to the identification and analysis of geopolitical water issues arising from the world’s growing and vast water deficits, and is also a co-founder of SmartMarkets, an eco-preneurial venture that applies web 2.0 technology and online social networking innovations to motivate energy & water conservation. He previously worked for an independent power producer in Central Asia; co-authored an article appearing in the Summer 2010 issue of the Tulane Environmental Law Journal, titled: “The Water Ethic: The Inexorable Birth Of A Certain Alienable Right”; and authored an article appearing in the inaugural issue of Johns Hopkins University's Global Water Magazine in July 2010 titled: “H2Own: The Water Ethic and an Equitable Market for the Exchange of Individual Water Efficiency Credits.”