World’s Largest Rooftop Farm To Open Soon In Paris

Via Fast Company, a report on the world’s largest rooftop farm which is due to open soon in Paris: Large rooftop farms aren’t new—in Chicago’s South Side, a 75,000-square-foot greenhouse on top of a factory building grows up to 10 million heads of leafy greens each year (and was the largest rooftop greenhouse in the world when […]

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Automatically Estimating Rooftop Solar Potential

Via Solar Daily, a report on a new method to automatically estimate rooftop solar potential: Industry figures show the global rate of solar energy installations grew by 30 percent in one recent year, and the average cost of installing solar has fallen from $7 per watt to $2.8 per watt, making rooftop solar attractive to many […]

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Roof-Top Farming In India

Via The Hindustan Times, an article on a program in India that encourages roof-top farming: As part of Bihar government’s initiative to encourage roof-top farming in urban areas, horticulture department officials have begun work to identify 230 “suitable” roof tops for which applications have already been invited. The key objective behind the initiative is to […]

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Tesla Solar Roof: New Time Frame for Ramp-Up

Via Inverse, an interesting report on the timing of Tesla’s solar roof: Tesla’s solar roof could take a while to come to your home. During the company’s first quarter 2019 earnings call Wednesday, CEO Elon Musk explained that the company will move slowly with manufacturing the energy-harvesting tiles to ensure the design will last for […]

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Rooftop Economics: Tesla’s New Solar Roof Cheaper Than Normal Roof

Via Inhabitat, an interesting report on Tesla’s new solar roof: Good news for those who have been eyeing Tesla’s new Solar Roof – the company just announced pricing for its photovoltaic tiles, and they come in at just $21.85 per square foot. That’s nearly 20 percent cheaper than a normal roof once you factor in the energy savings […]

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Rooftop Solar Panels Underpin Household Income In Rural Iran

Via The Iran Project, an interesting look at how rooftop income can change lives in emerging markets: Households in some deprived regions in South Khorasan Province that have built solar panels on their rooftops are earning almost $75 per month, the head of the provincial Regional Electricity Company said. “Close to 155 families have rooftop […]

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About This Blog And Its Author
As potential uses for building and parking lot roofspace continue to grow, unique opportunities to understand and profit from this trend will emerge. Roof Options is committed to tracking the evolving uses of roof estate – spanning solar power, rainwater harvesting, wind power, gardens & farms, “cooling” sites, advertising, apiculture, and telecom transmission platforms – to help unlock the nascent, complex, and expanding roofspace asset class.

Educated at Yale University (Bachelor of Arts - History) and Harvard (Master in Public Policy - International Development), Monty Simus has held a lifelong interest in environmental and conservation issues, primarily as they relate to freshwater scarcity, renewable energy, and national park policy. Working from a water-scarce base in Las Vegas with his wife and son, he is the founder of Water Politics, an organization dedicated to the identification and analysis of geopolitical water issues arising from the world’s growing and vast water deficits, and is also a co-founder of SmartMarkets, an eco-preneurial venture that applies web 2.0 technology and online social networking innovations to motivate energy & water conservation. He previously worked for an independent power producer in Central Asia; co-authored an article appearing in the Summer 2010 issue of the Tulane Environmental Law Journal, titled: “The Water Ethic: The Inexorable Birth Of A Certain Alienable Right”; and authored an article appearing in the inaugural issue of Johns Hopkins University's Global Water Magazine in July 2010 titled: “H2Own: The Water Ethic and an Equitable Market for the Exchange of Individual Water Efficiency Credits.”